A Roof

This week I worked on the caravan roof. It was filthy, so before I could do anything, I had to clean it. This is a bit tricky on an 8ft high roof that won’t support any weight, with a stepladder that’s far too short and on an uneven gravel driveway. Luckily, after an hour of pratting about with the stepladder, Peggy (obviously not her real name) offered to lend me her extending ladder. A few hours with a hose pipe, a broom and a ladder got the roof much closer to its original colour.

Caravan roof. It's very dirty with algae and moss, and will need cleaning before the leaking seams can be addressed.
Caravan roof. It’s very dirty with algae and moss, and will need cleaning before the leaking seams can be addressed.

 

The caravan roof, now a bit cleaner.
The caravan roof, now a bit cleaner.

Kitty had some left over lead replacer. It’s a very sticky silver tape that does the job that lead used to do in roofing, by being flexible and sitting over joins to keep the water out. The glue doesn’t react to water, so it will stay on even if it gets soaked.

The trick to getting the tape on a caravan is to stick one end down, then push the roll towards the middle of the roof, peeling off the plastic backing as you go. When it gets to the middle, use the broom to push the plastic backing to the far side of the caravan so that you can reach it from that side. Move your ladder to the other side and then you can just pull the backing towards you and the tape will unroll pretty evenly and stick immediately. A quick rub with the broom to make sure all the edges are stuck down and you’re done. i used small pieces to cover any holes I discovered, too. It also seems that I left my broom up there.

Caravan roof with tape over the seams. the closest sdtrip of tape is a bit wrinkly. There is a broom on the roof.
Caravan roof with tape over the seams. the closest strip of tape is a bit wrinkly. There is a broom on the roof.

You might also notice that the black bin liner has been replaced by a new vent cover. Currently, only the external part is fitted as we haven’t completed the ceiling inside, so we can’t fit the internal half. Not wanting to make extra holes in the caravan skin, I’ve followed then original builder’s technique and stuck it down with sealant instead of screws. The sealant promises to be burglar-proof, so hopefully this vent won’t just lift out like its predecessor did.

Next I plan to replace more of the ceiling beams, as Kitty picked up some more wood for me. After that, the wall next to the door needs some work, and the lower half of the door needs to be rebuilt as it’s a bit bendy.

Costs so far:

  • Caravan £100
  • Door retainers £1.85 each (bought 2)
  • Ceiling vent £46.44
  • 25x50mm pack of 10 4.2m treated beams £17.22

Total: £167.36

Things I have found for free because they were leftovers from Kitty’s projects:

  • Lead replacer tape
  • More treated beams
  • Various screws and tools
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